Samuel Strong

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Academic Publications

 

This paper uses insights from the philosopher Michel Foucault to shed new light on the operation of food banks in the UK. It demonstrates how food banks do not simply distribute food freely, but rather exercise a vital politics that seeks to regulate, control and improve the lives of those in food poverty. The paper theorises the three key logics that underpin the vital politics of foodbanking: interpretation, provisioning and improvement. 

Strong, S. 2019.

People's Geography

International Encyclopedia of Human Geography (Vol. 2)

A long encyclopedia piece on the topic of 'people's geography.' People's geography centres on the relationship between the production of geographical knowledge and its everyday usage. It proposes that the central purpose of our discipline is not simply to study the world, but to intervene in it.

This paper contributes to emerging literature on what is here conceptualised as 'actually existing austerity' - referring to the uneven ways in which austerity is felt, negotiated, embodied and contested in the varied tapestry of everyday life. The article interrogates the case study of UK food banking in order to examine changing acts and feelings of responsibility at a time of austerity. Specifically, this paper demonstrates the double-bind of austerity: it is those who are already most marginalised by policies of austerity who are concurrently having to fulfil emerging responsibilities left by a retreating state.

Strong, S. 2017.

Re-placing Poverty

The King's Review Volume: Extremes 78-88

To understand what poverty is, we must first contemplate where it takes root. In attempting to do so, this article offers three in-depth ethnographic insights that go beyond simply mapping poverty, and instead bear witness to the acts of neogitation, organisation and survival that mark everyday life in deprived areas.

Strong, S. 2014.

Underclass Ontologies

Political Geography 42 117-120

A long review commentary examining the recent Channel 4 television series 'Benefits Street' and its impacts upon viewings and perceptions of poverty, brought into conversation with several other key texts in the field.